Flowers for Sale

Community

 
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Janice partnered with the Santa Clara County Library District to create the county's Youth Poet Laureate Program. With a grant and fellowship support from the Academy of American Poets, Janice will host literary events, put together a team of organizers and judges, organize and host writing workshops to create a space for youth writers in the county.

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A podcast about BIPOC poems, pop culture, and the planets. And also, politics. 

2 Pinays telling stories about and in relation to astrology = Pinaystrology

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In Summer 2020, the United States once again reckoned with its history and reality of state-sanctioned violence. Project 846 was a local, small act of resistance borne from years of community organizing experiences where Janice and her husband organized their neighbors and friends. They held a small, COVID-19 public health compliant local rally everyday for 46 days (George Floyd's age) for at least 8 minutes and 46 seconds (the length of time it took police officer Derek Chauvin to murder Floyd). The daily protest is documented here.

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Sunday Jump is a community open mic series in Historic Filipinotown, Los Angeles. Express not impress. Free speech not hate speech. Poetry, music, and more.

Janice co-founded the space with poets Stephanie Sajor and Eddy M. Gana, Jr.

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Janice created this scholarship in memory of her mother, who was a single mother for six years. The scholarship is hosted with the San Mateo Community College Foundation. 

The purpose of the scholarship is to recognize students who have persevered academically having overcome a great hardship, having lived with a disability, being the first in their family to go to college, overcoming economic hardship, having re-entered college after a period of absence, identify as a single parent, or have been raised by one.

"Her examinations of self and family speak to the experiences of generations of Filipino-Americans, and even at its most specific the book is shot through with shades of the universal. The language is striking, creating a sense of control and poise in a story that is fractured, uncertain, and haunted by the unknown. San Jose isn't often known as a hub for literature, but Like a Solid to a Shadow might just start to change that."

by Mike Huguenor, San Jose Metroctive